(Re)Shaping Societies: Global Tasks for Public Relations in the 21st Century

Global Tasks for PR: Defence, Diplomacy and Development is a must-attend one-day conference being held at London College of Communication, University of the Arts London on Monday 4th July from 9.30am to 4pm.

DDD logo FINALThe conference brings together strategic communicators working within civil society and academics to explore and discuss the role of public relations and strategic communication theory and practice in shaping emerging and existing societies.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Adrian Monck, Head of Public Engagement, World Economic Forum – Public engagement as a driver of change for good
  • Kate Ferguson, Director of human rights NGO Protection Approaches and PaCCS Research Associate with the University of Cambridge – Countering Violent Extremism Through Communication Strategies
  • Eva Grosman, Centre for Democracy and Peace-Building, Northern Ireland
  • Stephen Jolly, Fellow, Defence Academy

Other contributors include: Albany Associates, a consultancy specialised in delivering communication strategies in challenging and transitional environments; practitioners from the UK Government’s ‘Good Governance Initiative’; Dr Margalit Toledano and Professor David McKie, University of Waikato, New Zealand, editor and contributor to the forthcoming title International PR: Perspectives from Deeply Divided Communities; and Professor Ryszard Lawniczak, Military University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland who developed the concept of “transitional PR” in Post-Communist Central and Eastern Europe states.

Academic papers will be presented by speakers from: Sciences Po Paris, France; l’Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium; The George Washington University, USA; Paris Sorbonne University, France; University of the Arts London, UK; University of Bucharest, Romania.

Through a series of keynote presentations, individual papers and panel presentations, answers to some of these questions will be sought: what is the role of PR in public diplomacy or setting global political agendas? How are states using communication strategically to support military campaigns and how can PR be used to help stabilisation efforts in post-conflict countries?

Moreover, what impact do these applied examples have on issues such as social development, social integration, social justice and peace-building, international relations and soft power?

Book your place now:

Date: Monday 4th July, 206
Venue: London College of Communication, University of the Arts London, SE1 6SB
Time: 9.30am to 4pm

Tickets: £41 (non-UAL) and £31 UAL. To register go to: http://bit.ly/globaltasks

Call for Papers: Defence, Diplomacy & Development – (Re)Shaping Societies: Global Tasks for Public Relations in the 21st Century

Defence, Diplomacy & Development – (Re)Shaping Societies: Global Tasks for Public Relations in the 21st Century

Monday 4th July, 2016

London College of Communication, University of the Arts London

The aim of this conference is to bring together strategic communicators working in civil society and academics to explore and discuss the role of public relations theory and practice in shaping emerging and existing societies. In recent years some public relations scholars have adopted a sociological perspective on strategic communication. This view sees the discipline as actively constructing and structuring the world in alignment with a number of structural forces – often corporate, governmental or state-based.

Such theories draw on a socially constructed epistemology (Heide, 2009; Ihlen and van Ruler, 2009) through which strategic communications practice “produce[s] a common social reality” (Heide, 2009: 43). Applications of these sociological analyses have tended to operate either at a theoretical level (Ihlen et al, 2009) or from a distinct critical perspective, employing concepts such as discourse theory or adopting readings of public relations as a cultural intermediary (Hodges, 2006).

The aim of this conference is to move beyond studies of what could be considered meso-level activities, such as marketing or corporate communication campaigns (Ihlen and van Ruler, 2009: 3) to focus scholarly attention on, arguably, macro-level communications activity and the ways it is responsible for shaping the values and norms of societies.

In particular we are interested in understanding how the increasingly professionalised and globalised discipline of public relations (Freitag and Stokes, 2009; Gannon and Pillai, 2013) shapes emerging societies in post-conflict or transitional environments. To advance such interests we have devised three thematic strands for the conference:

  • Defence: how are the military and intelligence agencies using communication strategically to prepare for, manage and embed specific state-focused or governmental aims? For example, how are ‘information ops’ deployed to destabilise hostile regimes; how is public relations used to communicate with civilians in conflict or post-conflict zones; how can strategic communications be used for coalition-building among local stakeholders (politicians, tribal elders, aid agencies, etc)?
  • Diplomacy – what communication strategies adopted by governments or inter-governmental organisations, such as the UN or NATO, are used to achieve opinion or behaviour change? This could include studies of inter-governmental lobbying for policy or regime change; the role of social media in engaging civilians as part of ‘public diplomacy’ campaigns; how can strategic communication – both interpersonal and external – be used in negotiation situations, e.g. terrorism, back-channel diplomacy, peace negotiations, etc?
  • Development – how is public relations used by stakeholders in supporting social development? This could include direct public-facing activity by NGOs and aid agencies, such as in-region public health awareness campaigns, the use of public relations in lobbying for aid budgets and aid programmes. Also, what role does PR play in higher ideas around progress, social integration, peace and social justice.

Although these themes lend themselves to the ‘global tasks’ facing public relations, we are also interested in receiving submissions about public relations’ role in shaping established societal frameworks – providing they cover some of the main issues raised above.

We welcome submissions that adopt a critical as well as functional account of public relations in the above contexts. The overarching aim of the conference is to encourage collaboration and partnership between practitioners and academics to develop new thinking across the field. We encourage challenging and thought-provoking proposals from individuals, groups or organisations.

Special Issue of Journal of Communication Management

The best papers will be selected to go for review by the Journal of Communication Management who will publish a Special Issue in support of the Conference.

If you would like to submit a paper for presentation at the conference, please email abstracts (400-600 words) to prglobaltasks [at] gmail [dot] com. The deadline for abstract submission is 15th February 2016.